Harry Willis Fleming
 
 
 

 
Chronology of the project
2000: the Shrine is a ruin
 
November 2006: the Shrine site cleared
 
September 2007: display cabinet installed for Heritage Open Days
 
September 2007: display cabinet installed for Heritage Open Days
 
An Act of Remembrance in November 2008 marked the official start of the restoration
 
November 2008
 
November 2008
 
November 2008
 
February 2009, felling the overgrown beech 'hedge'
 
February 2009
 
Display at Eastleigh Library
 
May 2009: 'Memory Shrine, Living History' workshops, with Jane Wildgoose
 
May 2009: 'Memory Shrine, Living History' workshops
 
May 2009: 'Interpreting North Stoneham Park' walk with Capability Brown expert John Phibbs and the Hampshire Gardens Trust
 
June 2009: Tour and lunch at the Shrine with The Mausolea & Monuments Trust
 
June 2009: Tour and lunch at the Shrine with The Mausolea & Monuments Trust
 
On Armistice Day 2009, pupils from Nightingale Primary School made and laid a poppy wreath
 
Armistice Day 2009
 
March 2010: John Adamson carves the inscriptions on the green oak lintel
 
April 2010: The team of architects (Radley House Partnership) and conservers (Magenta Building Repair) convene at the Shrine to start the work
 
April 2010: The school councillors of Nightingale Primary School immure sixteen coins under the first restoration stone
 
May 2010: progress with masonry
 
June 2010: oak lintel
 
June 2010: roof frame
 
October 2010
 
October 2010: roof tiling
 
October 2010: Ironwork under construction by Dorothea Restorations in Derby
 
October 2010: Excavation of perimeter fence and footings
 
November 2010
 
November 2010: the two half-round leaded windows created by John Yeo Stained Glass
 
December 2010: the ironworkers work in the snow
 
Oak doors installed
 
January 2011: iron finials installed
 
March 2011: the Roll of Honour plaques replaced some forty years after they were first removed to St Nicolas church
 
May 2011: the carved lintels gilded with gold leaf by Emily Willis Fleming
 
May 2011: the carved lintels gilded with gold leaf by Emily Willis Fleming
 

 
The War Shrine was rededicated at a special service and act of remembrance on 22 May 2011
 
22 May 2011
 
22 May 2011
 
22 May 2011
 
22 May 2011
 

 
Restoration of the Stoneham War Shrine
The War Shrine at North Stoneham, near Eastleigh in Hampshire was built in 1917 to commemorate the thirty-six men of North Stoneham parish who served and died in the Great War of 1914-1919. Later, it was neglected and vandalised, and by 1986 it was unroofed and derelict.
 
The Shrine was restored between 2008-2011. The programme began with an Act of Remembrance at the Shrine in November 2008, coinciding with the 90th anniversary of the Armistice.
 
As well as painstakingly returning the Shrine to its original state using traditional craft skills, the project furthered the conservation of the historic parkland where the monument stands, and used the Shrine as a key to unlocking the history of the local landscape - through a series of public events, talks & walks, activities for schools, an exhibition, and publication.
 
The Shrine is sited on Cricketers Hill in North Stoneham Park, a former 1000-acre parkland designed by 'Capability' Brown in the eighteenth century. The Shrine is one of an identical pair, the other is at Havenstreet on the Isle of Wight.
 
The project was a joint initiative between Eastleigh Borough Council and The Willis Fleming Historical Trust. It was made possible thanks to an initial grant of £50,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, and was further supported by Hampshire County Council, the Grants for War Memorials scheme, The Hampshire Gardens Trust, and several others.
 
For more information, see the project's website: The Restoration of the Stoneham War Shrine
 
 
Copyright © 1997-2018 Harry Willis Fleming. All rights reserved.